Wednesday, May 22, 2024
 
 

Digitalization and the future of work

- Advertisement -

The American philosopher Buckminster Fuller once stated that it is possible to study a caterpillar forever without being able to predict that it will become a butterfly. The same is not true for digitalization and artificial intelligence which have brought about substantial changes in labor market dynamics. The silky cocoon around the conventional 9 to 5 work arrangement is splitting as a result.

Traditional employment models, characterized by long-term contracts, characterized by long-term contracts, traveling to an office/physical facility, set hierarchies, and established roles, are increasingly becoming a thing of the past. Instead, we are witnessing a shift towards a more flexible and agile workforce that is project-based. Many companies now rely on a blend of in-house employees, consultants, and freelancers to meet their business needs.

Europe is in the grip of a skills crisis, which shows no signs of slowing down. Unemployment in the EU is at a record low but more than three-quarters of companies report difficulties in finding workers with the relevant skills.

It is in the digital sector that the skills shortage is the most pronounced. Sadly European data shows that 40 percent of adults and every third worker lack basic digital skills.

In our new study “The Future of Work Study 2023: Digitalization and the Labor of Tomorrow”, we highlight several themes and trends that should be addressed by European decision-makers. Three of these are: harnessing the power of digitalization; accepting the disruptive role of AI; and embracing lifelong learning.

The need to harness the power of digitalization

Companies are embracing remote work and digital tools, while individuals are adapting to technology in order to maximize productivity. The “as-a-service” trend is expanding, and businesses and individuals must embrace it.

Digitalization is also spawning new business models and industries, creating jobs and opportunities, but this is often forgotten or ignored in favor of a negative narrative on project-based activities. To empower the future of work, policymakers should engage with freelancers, platform workers, and entrepreneurs in order to understand the current reality and establish a legislative framework that helps it to thrive.

Breaking free from outdated perspectives of the labor market to unleash economic and social potential will be an important part of this evolution.

Accepting the disruptive role of AI

Artificial Intelligence, the simulation of human intelligence processes by machines, especially computer systems, is all around us and growing exponentially. Individuals need to work with machines and develop a symbiosis or their jobs and roles risk becoming obsolete in the labor market of the not-too-distant future. Similarly, companies and organizations need to understand the potential of AI and adopt processes, as well as integrate technology, in order to remain competitive as well as increase efficiencies.
Lifelong learning needs to be a reality, not a buzzword. Reskilling and upskilling are a vital part of succeeding in the new labor market paradigm since demands on personal effort and individual responsibility are increasing. Continuously upgrading skills and staying relevant is part of this so that workers can deliver value to organizations.


As a result,
education systems across Europe need to change in order to equip the youth with the knowledge, skills, and expertise that they require to excel in the future labor market. The pace of change is accelerating exponentially but education systems and the teaching profession more generally remain mired in traditional ways of doing things. A step change will be required at every level of education – while attracting competent and engaged teachers with the right skills – in order to equip workers and citizens with the skills that they need.

The digitalization of the labor market is not a threat, but an opportunity for individuals and economies to adapt, thrive, and redefine work in a rapidly changing world. Yet changes need to be made in order to allow this to happen. It is time to allow the butterfly to leave the chrysalis.

Companies are embracing remote work and digital tools, while individuals are adapting to technology in order to maximize productivity. The “as-a-service” trend is expanding, and businesses and individuals must embrace it. Digitalization is also spawning new business models and industries, creating jobs and opportunities, but this is often forgotten or ignored in favor of a negative narrative on project-based activities.

To empower the future of work, policymakers should engage with freelancers, platform workers, and entrepreneurs in order to understand the current reality and establish a legislative framework that helps it to thrive. Breaking free from outdated perspectives of the labor market to unleash economic and social potential will be an important part of this evolution.

- Advertisement -

Subscribe to our newsletter

Latest

U.S.-Kazakhstan dialogue on human rights and democratic reforms continues

The United States and Kazakhstan convened the third annual...

Tackling new threats to critical energy infrastructure

The explosions that targeted the Nord Stream pipelines from...

Georgia’s “Foreign Representatives Law” moves forward amid protests

On May 14, Georgia’s parliament approved (84/150) a hotly...

North Macedonia: Sliding back towards the political dark side?

As most analysts predicted after the strong showing of...

Don't miss

U.S.-Kazakhstan dialogue on human rights and democratic reforms continues

The United States and Kazakhstan convened the third annual...

Tackling new threats to critical energy infrastructure

The explosions that targeted the Nord Stream pipelines from...

Georgia’s “Foreign Representatives Law” moves forward amid protests

On May 14, Georgia’s parliament approved (84/150) a hotly...

North Macedonia: Sliding back towards the political dark side?

As most analysts predicted after the strong showing of...

A Green 5+1, regional water issues in Central Asia and previewing next year’s Astana International Forum

Kazakhstan’s Astana International Forum (AIF) has been postponed to 2025, as Astana...

U.S.-Kazakhstan dialogue on human rights and democratic reforms continues

The United States and Kazakhstan convened the third annual U.S.-Kazakhstan High-Level Dialogue on Human Rights and Democratic Reforms on May 20 in Astana, focusing...

Georgia’s “Foreign Representatives Law” moves forward amid protests

On May 14, Georgia’s parliament approved (84/150) a hotly contested law on “Transparency of Foreign Interests” regulating the amount of aid local civil society...

North Macedonia: Sliding back towards the political dark side?

As most analysts predicted after the strong showing of the nationalist presidential candidate in the first-round presidential elections on April 24, VMRO-DPMNE (Internal Macedonian...

A Green 5+1, regional water issues in Central Asia and previewing next year’s Astana International Forum

Kazakhstan’s Astana International Forum (AIF) has been postponed to 2025, as Astana is diverting financial resources to assist the relief efforts after massive flooding hit several regions....

Navigating the climate challenges for COP29

The impacts of climate change have become more evident as greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from human activities cause increased heat, drought, floods etc. Changes...

Uzbekistan to mobilize investment in environmental protection, sustainable development

NE Global sat down for an interview, in the Uzbek capital, during the 3rd Tashkent International Investment Forum (TIIF) with Aziz Abdukhakimov, Uzbekistan's Minister of Ecology,...

New wave of U.S. sanctions target Russia’s foreign suppliers and industrial base

On May 1, the U.S. Department of State together with the U.S. Treasury Department unveiled a wide-ranging new list of anti-Russia sanctions covering an...

EU sharply reduces visa access for Ethiopians

 Citing the lack of Ethiopian cooperation to facilitate repatriation of citizens deported from EU member states, the EU Council announced on April 29 a...